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Chimichurri Sauce

Chimichurri is an herb-based condiment that has roots of origin in Argentina and Uruguay. It is often served on top of or alongside grilled chicken, grilled steaks, roast beef, roast pork and pork sausages. It is made from parsley, garlic, salt and pepper in a base of olive oil and vinegar. Some versions add dried oregano; a pinch of hot pepper; others add chopped cilantro or a bit of chopped onion. The amount of garlic in each recipe varies from a few cloves to a whole head.

The recipe below is from Danielle Polansky and is in the book, “Become a Fat-Burning Machine.”

Ingredients

1…Read More »

Glycemic Index Sugar Alcohols

What are Sugar Alcohols?

 

Contrary to what the column title may suggest, a sugar alcohol is neither a sugar nor an alcoholic beverage. They are white, water-soluble solids that can occur naturally or be produced industrially from sugars. They are used widely in the food industry as thickeners and sweeteners. In commercial foodstuffs, sugar alcohols are commonly used in place of table sugar (sucrose), often in combination with high-intensity artificial sweeteners to counter the low sweetness. Common sugar alcohols include glycerol, erythritol, threitol, arabitol, xylitol, ribitol, mannitol, sorbitol, galactitol, fucitol, iditol, insitiol, volemitol, isomalt, malitol, lactitol and maltotetraitol. Xylitol is perhaps the most popular…Read More »

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Be a Sugar Detective

 

In addition to looking at the ingredient list for added sugar, check the grams of sugar per serving size on the nutrition label. Divide the grams of sugar by 4 and you can determine how many teaspoons of sugar are present in a single serving.

Sugar is added to many, many pre-packaged foods. You might not guess that there is sugar in your blue cheese dressing, your soup or your pasta sauce.

Never assume any processed food is sugar-free until you verify for yourself.

 …Read More »

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Ask Gale: What Is a High-Fat Diet?

In 2014 and early 2015 when we were working on refining what would become the book “Become a Fat-Burning Machine,” the medical community defined a “high-fat diet” as a diet that contains over 30 percent of the calories as fat. (See reference below.) Even when the book was published in late 2015, people were still on the bandwagon that touted low-carb and low-calorie diets as the optimal solution for weight loss and good health.

Wow, a lot has changed in the last two years!

Now, it is mainstream knowledge that diets high in sugar and refined carbohydrates are contributors to obesity,…Read More »

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What are the Differences Between Paleo, Keto and Fat-Burning Machine Diets?

 

I know the differences between different diets can be confusing. I thought the easiest way to look at the differences between three of the most popular eating plans is to put them on a chart.

The food category is the left column of the chart, then each eating program is across the top of the chart. The differences between each eating program is marked by allowed, excluded (or not allowed) and limited.

You will notice the only item on the chart that is excluded from the Fat-Burning Machine program is sugar. There are six other categories that are considered limited. Let me…Read More »

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How to Enjoy Thanksgiving Without Eating a Cup of Sugar

 

The Thanksgiving meal is a wonderful time to enjoy family and friends. The social aspects of the day are certainly most important – much more important than consuming large and uncomfortable quantities of food.

Participants in my Fat-Burning Machine class were shocked to know that people eating a typical Thanksgiving meal will consume nearly a cup of sugar.  A cup! They were also surprised to know that with some modifications, they could still enjoy wine, pie and whipped cream.

I’m attaching a chart below that details the amount of fat, carbohydrate, sugar, protein and calories in a typical Thanksgiving meal. Below the…Read More »

Activia Blueberry Nonfat Greek_vs_Plain Whole Fat_Dannon

Yogurt Labels – How You can be Mislead by Serving Size and Calories

 

In a previous post I compared two yogurt labels, different brands, where both serving sizes were 1 cup. One of the yogurts had nearly seven teaspoons of sugar in it!

In today’s post, I want to compare three yogurts from the same company – Dannon. The first yogurt is the Activia fat-free blueberry flavor, the second one is the plain whole milk, and the final one is whole fat plain Greek yogurt.

The first thing I find incredibly annoying and misleading is that the serving size for the Activa is 4 ounces, while the other two yogurts have serving sizes of…Read More »

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Food Labels can be off by 20 Percent

 

If you once were, or still are, a calorie-counter you may be surprised to know that food labels are allowed to be off by as much as 20%. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Nutrition Labeling Guide notes that for calories, sugars, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium, food manufacturers are considered in compliance if they are within 20% of the value shown on the label.

For example, if you select a packaged snack that contains 100 calories – that snack could contain up to 120 calories and still be within federal labeling guidelines. A 150-calorie snack could contain…Read More »

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HOW much sugar has been added to that yogurt? Nearly 7 teaspoons in a cup?!   

 

I went to a breakfast buffet this morning and like normal, I read the labels on two containers of yogurt. The one on the left is non-fat plain. The one on the right is full-fat honey flavor.

The one on the left has 6 grams of sugars in a cup. Those sugars come from milk’s naturally occurring sugars – lactose. The one on the right has a whopping 33 grams of sugars. If we pull out the 6 grams of naturally occurring sugars in one cup of plain yogurt, that means 27 grams of sugar has been added to the honey…Read More »